Birchall on Giyani Metals’ manganese milestone.

“It is quite important milestone. It establishes the first basis of the true value of the company. It shows that we have sufficient material, probably for something like a 10-year mine life. In conjunction with that the hydrometallurgical testing shows that the process actually works for producing the key particle that we want to make, which is EMM, which is electrolytic manganese metal. That is the key metal that goes into the cathodes for battery electric vehicles and for stationary storage.” States Robin Birchall, CEO & Director of Giyani Metals Corp. (TSXV: WDG), in an interview with InvestorIntel Corp. CEO Tracy Weslosky.

Tracy Weslosky: I am speaking with you where? I understand you are in Africa. 

Robin Birchall: I am in Botswana just dealing with some of the stuff that we need to on the ground here at the project.

Tracy Weslosky: You just put out a news release on your maiden resource from your K.Hill project. Can you tell us a little bit more about what is happening with Giyani Metals and what you were trying to say? 

Robin Birchall: It is quite important milestone. It establishes the first basis of the true value of the company. It shows that we have sufficient material, probably for something like a 10-year mine life. In conjunction with that the hydrometallurgical testing shows that the process actually works for producing the key particle that we want to make, which is EMM, which is electrolytic manganese metal. That is the key metal that goes into the cathodes for battery electric vehicles and for stationary storage.

Tracy Weslosky: It is my understanding that the results will now allow you to proceed with your PEA. Is that correct?

Robin Birchall: Yeah, that is right. We are going to start with that as soon as possible. We have some calls on Friday with the team. We have 3 or 4 quotes then we will decide who is going to do that for us, probably on Friday. The timeline for that we have been quoted on is about 8 to 10 weeks. That will put us with a PEA sometime around Christmas. It will probably be delayed because of the Christmas period I would imagine.

Tracy Weslosky: I often encourage investors to take a look at the CEO’s background on Linkedin. I will tell you, you have an impressive professional career Robin. In addition to that you have just appointed a new board member. Can you kind of give the InvestorIntel audience a reminder of what kind of strength you have in your core team and management please?

Robin Birchall: Talking about me, I have quite a long background in the mineral resource sector; long time corporate financier and then moved over to the investor side; was appointed to a number of boards and executive positions. We built a mine at the company I was the executive chairman of and then I was asked to join Giyani at the end of last year. Since then we have added a number of board members. We added Mike Jones earlier in the year, somebody I worked with. Has a very long track record both on the corporate side, mine management side and on the finance side; worked in Botswana for 8 years. Then more recently with Duane Parnham deciding that he no longer wanted to continue as the chairman and looking to take a bit more time for himself and move towards retirement, we appointed Jonathan Henry who was the CEO of Gabriel Resources, quite a large gold mining company in Romania. He has a very long history of operating mines. He was a previous client of mine. We are quite privileged to add somebody of his caliber…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: Giyani Metals Corp. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.




Giyani Metals is targeting the battery market with its maiden manganese resource

Lithium and cobalt have been riding a wave on the broad electric vehicle revolution, however there is another metal used as a battery component that has received lesser attention from the markets. That metal is manganese, a chemical element that is normally found together with iron. The latest up and coming technology to use manganese is the lithiated manganese dioxide (LMD) battery. A typical LMD battery uses 61% of manganese in its mix and only 4% lithium. LMDs have numerous benefits, including providing higher power output, thermal stability, and improved safety compared to regular lithium ion batteries.

Manganese is a metal with important industrial metal alloy uses, particularly in stainless steels. In more recent times due to the EV boom, lithium ion battery demand is boosting demand for manganese. Technavio forecasts the global manganese battery market is expected to grow at a CAGR of above 7% during the period 2018-2022.

Giyani Metals Kanye Manganese Project

Giyani Metals Corp. (TSXV: WDG) is currently developing three prospects (K. Hill, Otse, and Lobatse) within a large property covering over 8,000 sq km. Located in the Kanye basin in Botswana Africa these prospects include several past producing manganese mines. Giyani’s mission is to revive these dormant resources and bring them back into production with the goal to become a leading independent supplier of low cost, high grade feed-stock manganese for the battery industry.

Giyani’s Kanye Manganese Project has several advantages that make it unique including near surface deposition, low levels of impurities, access to infrastructure in a mining-friendly jurisdiction, and easy access to multiple shipping ports.

The K. Hill Manganese Deposit

The most advanced of the 3 projects is underlain by rocks of the Transvaal Super-group in northern South Africa and southern Botswana. The Transvaal hosts roughly 80% of the world’s manganese reserves and has been identified in Botswana both under cover and beneath the Kalahari desert sands. This deposit is of particular interest to Giyani because it is proof of concept that manganese deposits exist in Botswana and that the manganese displays simple yet ideal chemical compositions and grade characteristics that would be attractive to battery manufacturers.

On September 28, 2018 Giyani announced a maiden resource for the 88% owned K. Hill deposit. The mineral resource estimate includes an inferred resource of 1.1 million tonnes grading 31.2% manganese oxide (MnO) at a cut-off grade of 18% MnO.

Robin Birchall, CEO of Giyani Metals Corp., commented:  “This maiden resource at K. Hill represents a significant milestone in the development of our company. The scale of this resource gives us confidence to immediately proceed with a preliminary economic assessment (PEA). We now have a proven tangible asset that adds intrinsic value to our shareholders. We are putting Giyani on the map as an active player in the growing battery electric vehicle market.”

The Continuing Demand

Manganese will continue to be a key element in steel production, and the industry should continue to grow at a steady pace. On the technology side, electric vehicles, off grid power systems, and other energy storage applications will require significant amounts of high quality manganese. There is global shortage of manganese projects, and this could be the right time for investors to capitalize on this opportunity presented by Giyani. The increase in demand has started to rally flake manganese prices back to record highs.

Giyani Metals Corp. is a junior mineral exploration company, engaging in the acquisition, exploration, evaluation, and development of gold, manganese, and precious metal mining projects in South Africa and Canada and is headquartered in Oakville, Canada.




Giyani Metals CEO on huge market demand for manganese

July 4, 2018 – “The market is very strong at the moment. I do not know if you noticed, but CATL listed in Hong Kong raising over a billion dollars. They are going to be the largest battery manufacturer. Demand is just going to be huge for the manganese units going forward.” states Robin Birchall, CEO & Director of Giyani Metals Corp. (TSXV: WDG), in an interview with InvestorIntel’s Peter Clausi.

Peter Clausi: We are here to talk about Gyiani Metals and manganese. You have 3 properties in Botswana.   

Robin Birchall: That is correct. We have the K. Hill, Otse, and Lobatse.

Peter Clausi: Which is your favorite? 

Robin Birchall: I would say my favorite is K. Hill. It is the most advanced of all of them.

Peter Clausi: Did you buy that in advanced stage or were you the ones who moved it along?

Robin Birchall: No, we have moved everything along. We have done all the drilling this year. We have done that in a very short period of time, about 4 months, completed our drilling at K. Hill. We are now drilling at Otse, which is our second property. Because we are under budget, cash and meters wise we are even going to drill at Lobatse.

Peter Clausi: Nice. You do not hear that too often. How many holes did you drill at K. Hill?

Robin Birchall: We drilled 18 holes there. One of which was a metallurgical hole. We have drilled now 4 holes at Otse, a good 3 holes left to do there. We plan probably about 6 at Lobatse.

Peter Clausi: Where do you assay those? Is it in country or do you ship them out?

Robin Birchall: No. They go to SGS, Randfontein in South Africa. All the samples have gone from K. Hill to SGS, Randfontein and we are waiting for them to come back. They will be back in the next 10 days.

Peter Clausi: It takes what, about a week for you to compile those into a press release?

Robin Birchall: Yeah, I am hoping to have some initial results. Yeah, that is our next press release will be something on the grades we are seeing in the holes.

Peter Clausi: That is often a major catalyst; looking forward to seeing that. Will that include the second drill program as well or just K. Hill?

Robin Birchall: No, K. Hill is for resource and Otse is where it is not quite exploration, but it is not quite enough to be a resource. It is really for us to understand that deposit a little bit better.

Peter Clausi: If I remember your press releases correctly, you were counting on premium pricing for your manganese given its quality.

Robin Birchall: That is correct. From the visual inspection we are pretty happy with what we have got there, but obviously the assays have to come back.

Peter Clausi: What do you see happening in the manganese market?

Robin Birchall: That is a really good question. The market is very strong at the moment. I do not know if you noticed, but CATL listed in Hong Kong raising over a billion dollars. They are going to be the largest battery manufacturer. Demand is just going to be huge for the manganese units going forward…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: Giyani Metals Corp. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.




Giyani Metals CEO on manganese for the battery market

March 22, 2018 – “What we are really interested in here is manganese for the battery market. It is a little bit different than for the steel market.” states Robin Birchall, CEO & Director of Giyani Metals Corp. (TSXV: WDG), in an interview with InvestorIntel’s Peter Clausi.

Peter Clausi: You are a recent addition to the company I understand. 

Robin Birchall: That is right. I joined the company at the back end of last year just before we did a small financing.

Peter Clausi: You raised $2 million dollars? 

Robin Birchall: Yes, just a little bit more than $2 million. We also took in some cash. We have some holdings, liquid holdings in some other companies. We sold a little bit of that at the same time.

Peter Clausi: Right before joining Giyani you were part of another management team that took a project through to mine production.

Robin Birchall: That is right.

Peter Clausi: Now you have left that to do hopefully the same thing here.

Robin Birchall: Yeah, that is definitely the plan.

Peter Clausi: And our metal of choice?

Robin Birchall: What we are really interested in here is manganese for the battery market. It is a little bit different than for the steel market. That is something that is taking a bit of education with people to explain.

Peter Clausi: What is it, a different formulation, a different size, different flake?

Robin Birchall: The best way I can explain it is to maybe think about coal. You have thermal coal and coking coal. They are not interchangeable.

Peter Clausi: Right.

Robin Birchall: You have something similar in manganese. You have direct shipping ore that goes to the steel market and then you have high-grade ore, which can be turned into very high purity manganese flake that goes into the cathodes for the batteries. These two things are not very interchangeable.

Peter Clausi: And you have the EMM.

Robin Birchall: So far the indications that we have are very high-grade material that can be used to make EMM.

Peter Clausi: What is next then on the company development path?

Robin Birchall: Right now we have been doing all our budgeting and planning for the field program. We have got our board meeting actually in a couple of days’ time where we will approve the budgets and go ahead with the drill program and the geophysics. Then also we have a little bit of metallurgical testing that we are doing at the same time.

Peter Clausi: Okay. Drill program should be done by late summer?

Robin Birchall: We will be a little bit early on that. I think that the drilling program will be going through April so we will start to have results in April and a few more in May. We have some material that is on site right now. We will have the drill results that will come directly from the drilling. Then we will be doing the metallurgical tests and we will start the metallurgical testing very soon on the stockpile. Then that testing will go a little bit into May and so we will have a series of results in May. Then in June we will probably have the resource.

Peter Clausi: Was this meant to be confirmatory drilling or resource definition?

Robin Birchall: This is resource definition. You have to remember that the overall scale of the deposit we have a pretty good idea of that…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: Giyani Metals Corp. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.




Dr Ian Flint on the evolving global graphene and graphite market

Dr Ian Flint, Senior Editor at InvestorIntel in an interview with InvestorIntel’s Kelly Bird discuss the graphite and graphene market. Ian explains that exploration companies in the graphite sector racing towards production are realizing that they have to do more than produce graphite. In fact they are they are more of a processor and intermediary for applications. For example, lithium-ion battery companies do not buy graphite off the shelf, they must collaborate to insure that their graphite flake is compatible with the battery being manufactured before any sales are made. He then goes on to discuss his advisory roles with CKR Carbon Corporation (TSXV: CKR), a company focused on mine to market commercialization of graphite products, and Giyani Metals Corp. (TSXV: WDG), a junior manganese mining resource company in South Africa.

Kelly Bird: Tell me what is going on in the graphene market today?

Ian Flint: There is a number of applications that are being developed in graphene, for example, into plastics as a composite. Now you can buy graphene hockey sticks for example. It is also being put into a lot paints for corrosion resistance. There is also work being done putting it into things, like, energy storage and things like that. The same problem that has been plaguing the graphene market for many years still exists, which is quality control and a supply of reliable inexpensive graphene. Until those are solved the applications grow in slow increment.

Kelly Bird: What about the graphite market?

Ian Flint: The junior companies are slowly learning that to be into the graphite is you are not a miner. You are a processor and intermediary to applications as opposed to a mine. The classic model in which geologists get together and make a company and sell it to a senior in graphite just does not work. What you need in graphite is to identify the applications you are going to sell into then find the graphite source for that. You have to be prepared to start an operating company. You have to have the team together to do that. I think that the junior mining space is recognizing that fact. There has been a number of strides forward in the industry so I think it is a positive outlook.

Kelly Bird: Which brings me to my next question, what is the difference, for those of us who do not know, between synthetic graphite and real graphite… to access the complete interview, click here




Wajd Boubou on the manganese market and Giyani Metals

Wajd Boubou, President of Giyani Metals Corp. (TSXV: WDG) (“Giyani Metals”) in an interview with InvestorIntel CEO Tracy Weslosky discuss Giyani Metals’ recent company name change and new focus on the manganese market. With 7 new licenses in a distinct geological area containing “very high-grade manganese”, Wajd shares Giyani Metals is planning on catering to the lithium-ion battery industry. Wajd also discusses how he recently became President of Giyani Metals and states his interest with the company started as an investor.

Tracy Weslosky: You just changed your name and just made an announcement for 7 new licenses. Tell us more about these.

Wajd Boubou: These 7 licenses are very important because we believe that they are on the perimeter of a very distinct geological area and they contain very high-grade manganese.

Tracy Weslosky: Everybody out there, I don’t know if you know what the market looks like for manganese, but tell us more. What’s happening with the manganese market right now Wajd?

Wajd Boubou: Well, the manganese market is predominately a steel play and the ferroalloy and non-ferroalloy play, but we are specialized in a very small part of the market, which caters to the battery industry and generally speaking it’s called the chemical part of the manganese market. That’s what we’re focusing on right now.

Tracy Weslosky: Of course, we love batteries at InvestorIntel. Some of you may not be familiar with Giyani Metals. Can you give us an overview about who Giyani Metals are…

Wajd Boubou: Giyani is a company that started out as a gold exploration company. That was years ago. Hence the old name, Giyani Gold. Now with the new focus, about a year ago we decided to shift our business and focus on an exponentially growing market, which is the lithium-ion rechargeable battery market. That’s what we’re focusing on right now… to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: Giyani Metals Corp. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.

 




Ecclestone on the gold market and vanadium

Christopher Ecclestone, EU Sr. Editor and Analyst for InvestorIntel in an interview with InvestorIntel CEO Tracy Weslosky discuss the gold market and vanadium. Christopher tells us that the gold market is waiting for interest rate signals before moving. And after placing a buy recommendation on Sage Gold, Christopher tells us that the most important metric is still, “production, production, production.” Christopher also discusses the value of vanadium, cobalt, and manganese in the battery space… to access the complete interview, click here