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CBLT’s Clausi on selling assets for a profit.

“As we all know it is a difficult mining market out there. There are many companies whose values are not reflected in their share price. You can either sit around and whine about it or you can do something about it. My board told me to do something about it. We bought non-core assets, packaged them, went to Australia, met with anybody who would meet with us and was able to sell these assets to create a profit for CBLT back in Canada. In essence we did a hard $1 million dollar financing without any fees on top.” States Peter Clausi, President, CEO and Director of CBLT Inc. (TSXV: CBLT), in an interview with InvestorIntel Corp. CEO Tracy Weslosky.

Tracy Weslosky: How does it feel to be a junior that is actually making money? Can you tell your shareholders and investors out there a little bit about what you are doing right now?

Peter Clausi: Sure. As we all know it is a difficult mining market out there. There are many companies whose values are not reflected in their share price. You can either sit around and whine about it or you can do something about it. My board told me to do something about it. We bought non-core assets, packaged them, went to Australia, met with anybody who would meet with us and was able to sell these assets to create a profit for CBLT back in Canada. In essence we did a hard $1 million dollar financing without any fees on top.

Tracy Weslosky: While you were in Australia we had a couple of investors in town last week they are telling me that Australia is experiencing a gold rush and they are redirecting their attention towards the resource sector. Is this correct? Is this consistent with your own conclusions having just gotten back from Australia? 

Peter Clausi: Australia does not have the same kind of risk capital market that Canada or the United States has. They do not have a cannabis market. They do not have a crypto market. The risk capital has stayed in junior high-tech, junior mining, junior oil and gas. It has not fragmented so there is more capital available. Yes, there have been a couple of recent discoveries in the gold sector that have juiced the market generally. Plus the rebirth of rare earths and lithium, we will call it 2.5 because we are not quite at lithium 3.0 yet, has also helped to excite the market. George and his buddies at Northern have done a real good job of bringing that project to market. They were a big hit when they were traveling in New York and it has helped to re-excite the rare earths market.   

Tracy Weslosky: Peter I have to tell you, I do not know if you have seen how Neo’s stock has moved. There is a lot of interest in electric cars as you know. We do not have the cobalt that we need. I do not understand why people are not lined up around the block to have your conflict-free mineral source of cobalt here in Canada. What is going on there? What is the disconnect between the cobalt demand, as we know there is a real shortage, and the interest in CBLT for instance?

Peter Clausi: There are a lot of reasons for it. It is a market that still lacks credibility. There is a group in Australia that reports in “cobalt equivalent” by taking a little bit of copper and a little bit of gold and a little bit of silver and doing some magic and increasing their cobalt number. Things like that hurt all of us. I wish they would stop doing it. The other problem we have is, cobalt is a bizarre metal. It is only found in a few places around the globe in mineable quantities. 60% of it comes from the Congo so anything that happens in the Congo affects cobalt globally…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: CBLT Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.




Cobalt Blockchain on changing the way the world sources conflict minerals

July 4, 2018 – “Today minerals are traced in the Congo. You have got tin, tantalum, tungsten, cobalt, which are considered conflict metals. The early incumbent system is all paper-based log books. We think that blockchain is a significant way to improve mineral provenance and certify where it has come from, how it is produced and essentially it is a distributed ledger and it is really facilitating and automating trust between counterparties in the supply chain. We are the intermediary between artisanal miners and our offtake partner.” states Lance Hooper, President & COO and Director of Cobalt Blockchain Inc. (TSXV: COBC), in an interview with InvestorIntel Corp. CEO Tracy Weslosky.

Tracy Weslosky: Lance I think you are basically going to be the first ethical supplier of DRC cobalt. Is that correct? 

Lance Hooper: Yeah, that is our plan Tracy in the next quarter. We have put a number of the building blocks in place; initial supply agreement. Right now we are building out depot infrastructure and implementing the mineral traceability system that we have developed in the last 3 months. 

Tracy Weslosky: InvestorIntel audience, here is what we have. We have cobalt, which is in demand around the world and, of course, we have technology with blockchain. Can you explain to us a little bit more about how you are utilizing blockchain technology to change the cobalt industry? 

Lance Hooper: Sure. Today minerals are traced in the Congo. You have got tin, tantalum, tungsten, cobalt, which are considered conflict metals. The early incumbent system is all paper-based log books. We think that blockchain is a significant way to improve mineral provenance and certify where it has come from, how it is produced and essentially it is a distributed ledger and it is really facilitating and automating trust between counterparties in the supply chain. We are the intermediary between artisanal miners and our offtake partner…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: Cobalt Blockchain Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.




Peter Clausi on the global cobalt market

March 14, 2018 — “There is a limited supply of cobalt. The supply chain out of the Congo is weak. There are not many other places in the world that produce it and as a result demand has been going up.” states Peter Clausi in an interview with InvestorIntel’s Andy Gaudry.

Andy Gaudry: Peter, why has cobalt gone up over 400% over the past 2 years?

Peter Clausi: Basic economics of supply and demand. Demand is increasing. Supply is falling and at risk in the supply chain.

Sixty per cent of the world’s cobalt comes out of the Congo. I do not know if there is anybody who suffered more on the planet than the Congolese. Since King Leopold showed up in the late 1800’s, that poor area of the world has had just the life beat out of it.

It is having the life beat out of it because there is so many minerals in the ground that that the imperialists are fighting for it. Right now, it is copper and cobalt.

There is a limited supply of cobalt. The supply chain out of the Congo is weak. There are not many other places in the world that produce it and as a result demand has been going up.

Demand is also increasing because cobalt is used in the cathode of lithium-ion batteries. You think we are going to sell fewer or more electric cars next year? The answer is more. Electric toothbrushes, power tools, laptops, anything that has a lithium-ion battery in it for rapid charge / discharge needs cobalt. There is more cobalt than lithium in your cell phone battery. The world needs cobalt. Basic laws of supply and demand have just pushed the price up. 

Andy Gaudry: Where is it going to go and where is it going to end? 

Peter Clausi: Cobalt is up almost 400%, as you say, since February of 2016. Our call is for roughly $50 by the end of the year. The wild card here is the supply chain. Amnesty International and The Enough Project are agitating for the imposition of an external ethical supply Chain. We have recently seen Apple indicate that they will only buy cobalt from ethical sources. If the formalization of an ethical supply chain takes place then there really is no cap on where cobalt will go. That ethical supply chain will knock so much of the cobalt out of the supply chain, prices will spike…to access the complete interview, click here