CBLT’s Clausi on selling assets for a profit.

“As we all know it is a difficult mining market out there. There are many companies whose values are not reflected in their share price. You can either sit around and whine about it or you can do something about it. My board told me to do something about it. We bought non-core assets, packaged them, went to Australia, met with anybody who would meet with us and was able to sell these assets to create a profit for CBLT back in Canada. In essence we did a hard $1 million dollar financing without any fees on top.” States Peter Clausi, President, CEO and Director of CBLT Inc. (TSXV: CBLT), in an interview with InvestorIntel Corp. CEO Tracy Weslosky.

Tracy Weslosky: How does it feel to be a junior that is actually making money? Can you tell your shareholders and investors out there a little bit about what you are doing right now?

Peter Clausi: Sure. As we all know it is a difficult mining market out there. There are many companies whose values are not reflected in their share price. You can either sit around and whine about it or you can do something about it. My board told me to do something about it. We bought non-core assets, packaged them, went to Australia, met with anybody who would meet with us and was able to sell these assets to create a profit for CBLT back in Canada. In essence we did a hard $1 million dollar financing without any fees on top.

Tracy Weslosky: While you were in Australia we had a couple of investors in town last week they are telling me that Australia is experiencing a gold rush and they are redirecting their attention towards the resource sector. Is this correct? Is this consistent with your own conclusions having just gotten back from Australia? 

Peter Clausi: Australia does not have the same kind of risk capital market that Canada or the United States has. They do not have a cannabis market. They do not have a crypto market. The risk capital has stayed in junior high-tech, junior mining, junior oil and gas. It has not fragmented so there is more capital available. Yes, there have been a couple of recent discoveries in the gold sector that have juiced the market generally. Plus the rebirth of rare earths and lithium, we will call it 2.5 because we are not quite at lithium 3.0 yet, has also helped to excite the market. George and his buddies at Northern have done a real good job of bringing that project to market. They were a big hit when they were traveling in New York and it has helped to re-excite the rare earths market.   

Tracy Weslosky: Peter I have to tell you, I do not know if you have seen how Neo’s stock has moved. There is a lot of interest in electric cars as you know. We do not have the cobalt that we need. I do not understand why people are not lined up around the block to have your conflict-free mineral source of cobalt here in Canada. What is going on there? What is the disconnect between the cobalt demand, as we know there is a real shortage, and the interest in CBLT for instance?

Peter Clausi: There are a lot of reasons for it. It is a market that still lacks credibility. There is a group in Australia that reports in “cobalt equivalent” by taking a little bit of copper and a little bit of gold and a little bit of silver and doing some magic and increasing their cobalt number. Things like that hurt all of us. I wish they would stop doing it. The other problem we have is, cobalt is a bizarre metal. It is only found in a few places around the globe in mineable quantities. 60% of it comes from the Congo so anything that happens in the Congo affects cobalt globally…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: CBLT Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.




Croft on Pancontinental’s cobalt, copper and nickel deposits

“At our advanced stage McBride Project in southeastern Ontario, which is nickel-cobalt-copper, we have more than $700 million dollars in contained metal value based on a historic resource of 5.1 million tons…” States Layton Croft, President, CEO and Director of Pancontinental Resources Corporation (TSXV: PUC), in an interview with InvestorIntel Corp. CEO Tracy Weslosky.

Tracy Weslosky: Layton your stock charts look phenomenal over the last year. It is my understanding you have an unusual containment number, containment volume, for your copper, nickel and cobalt. Can you talk to me about this please?

Layton Croft: At our advanced stage McBride Project in southeastern Ontario, which is nickel-cobalt-copper, we have more than $700 million dollars in contained metal value based on a historic resource of 5.1 million tons, which was defined in the sixties and seventies.

Tracy Weslosky: I understand this is really rare. Okay, we have a lot of investors out there that are going, containment volume, what is that? Can you explain this to us a little bit more because those numbers sound impressive, but what does this mean? 

Layton Croft: I think what is rare for a junior exploration company of our size is to already have a deposit. In the case of the McBride Project it is actually two deposits. By contained metal value we are talking about the gross metal value. If you look at the amount of resources on a historic basis, pre-43-101 and the grades that were defined by the previous operator Long Lac Minerals, which was a very reputable company, and you do the math based on current market prices, that is where you come up with these numbers. Now the numbers are notional. They do not take into account recoverability and other factors, but they are very indicative of how much value is contained in the ground today. Again, for a junior exploration company it is very unusual.

Tracy Weslosky: Okay, but this is overall a very interesting junior company as well. It is very exceptional. You brought a team together that has done this before. Tell us a little bit about your team and what you plan on doing with Pancontinental.

Layton Croft: Right, Tracy. Over the past 6 months we have picked up two nickel-cobalt-copper projects in Ontario. In both cases we optioned them from two different companies. In both of those cases the people that we did the deals with are now the project managers on the ground. They are both very experienced exploration geologists who know these projects between 20 and 25 years. I think that is a very unique way to generate projects. 

Tracy Weslosky: We love copper. We believe that is the top technology metal. We believe it deserves a lot more attention. But, let us talk about cobalt because cobalt, you know, the prices are through the roof, the demand is fantastic, but the stocks are kind of languishing right now. Tell us about your cobalt deposit and why with all the competitors out there we should look at Pancontinental before anybody else…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: Pancontinental Resources Corporation is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.




Cobalt Blockchain on changing the way the world sources conflict minerals

July 4, 2018 – “Today minerals are traced in the Congo. You have got tin, tantalum, tungsten, cobalt, which are considered conflict metals. The early incumbent system is all paper-based log books. We think that blockchain is a significant way to improve mineral provenance and certify where it has come from, how it is produced and essentially it is a distributed ledger and it is really facilitating and automating trust between counterparties in the supply chain. We are the intermediary between artisanal miners and our offtake partner.” states Lance Hooper, President & COO and Director of Cobalt Blockchain Inc. (TSXV: COBC), in an interview with InvestorIntel Corp. CEO Tracy Weslosky.

Tracy Weslosky: Lance I think you are basically going to be the first ethical supplier of DRC cobalt. Is that correct? 

Lance Hooper: Yeah, that is our plan Tracy in the next quarter. We have put a number of the building blocks in place; initial supply agreement. Right now we are building out depot infrastructure and implementing the mineral traceability system that we have developed in the last 3 months. 

Tracy Weslosky: InvestorIntel audience, here is what we have. We have cobalt, which is in demand around the world and, of course, we have technology with blockchain. Can you explain to us a little bit more about how you are utilizing blockchain technology to change the cobalt industry? 

Lance Hooper: Sure. Today minerals are traced in the Congo. You have got tin, tantalum, tungsten, cobalt, which are considered conflict metals. The early incumbent system is all paper-based log books. We think that blockchain is a significant way to improve mineral provenance and certify where it has come from, how it is produced and essentially it is a distributed ledger and it is really facilitating and automating trust between counterparties in the supply chain. We are the intermediary between artisanal miners and our offtake partner…to access the complete interview, click here

Disclaimer: Cobalt Blockchain Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.