Peter Cashin on Imperial Mining’s high-recovery extraction process for rare earths and scandium

In a recent InvestorIntel interview, Tracy Weslosky speaks with Peter Cashin, President, CEO and Director of Imperial Mining Group Ltd. (TSXV: IPG | OTCQB: IMPNF) about Imperial’s recent milestones including their new high-recovery extraction process for rare earths and scandium. Additionally, they discuss Imperial’s recent news around their collaboration with Eck Industries to develop scandium-modified aluminum alloys.

In this InvestorIntel interview, which may also be viewed on YouTube (click here to subscribe to the InvestorIntel Channel), Peter went on to say that Imperial is not just a scandium play as its Crater Lake Project has a diversified commodity base with significant quantities of rare earths and niobium. He also provided an update on the latest drill results from Crater Lake and added that Imperial Mining’s objective is to create a sustainable scandium supply chain.

To watch the full interview, click here

About Imperial Mining Group Ltd.

Imperial is a Canadian mineral exploration and development company focused on the advancement of its technology metals projects in Québec. Imperial is publicly listed on the TSX Venture Exchange as “IPG” and on the OTCQB Exchange as “IMPNF” and is led by an experienced team of mineral exploration and development professionals with a strong track record of mineral deposit discovery in numerous metal commodities.

To learn more about Imperial Mining Group Ltd., click here

Disclaimer: Imperial Mining Group Ltd. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel Corp.

This interview, which was produced by InvestorIntel Corp. (IIC) does not contain, nor does it purport to contain, a summary of all the material information concerning the Company” being interviewed. IIC offers no representations or warranties that any of the information contained in this interview is accurate or complete. 

This presentation may contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation.  Forward-looking statements are based on the opinions and assumptions of management of the Company as of the date made. They are inherently susceptible to uncertainty and other factors that could cause actual events/results to differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Additional risks and uncertainties, including those that the Company does not know about now or that it currently deems immaterial, may also adversely affect the Company’s business or any investment therein.

Any projections given are principally intended for use as objectives and are not intended, and should not be taken,  as assurances that the projected results will be obtained by the Company. The assumptions used may not prove to be accurate and a potential decline in the Company’s financial condition or results of operations may negatively impact the value of its securities. Prospective investors are urged to review the Company’s profile on www.Sedar.com and to carry out independent investigations in order to determine their interest in investing in the Company.

If you have any questions surrounding the content of this interview, please email info@investorintel.com.




Scandium in Lithium-Ion Batteries? Now it gets interesting…

Scandium International Mining Corp. (TSX: SCY) says that it could have the world’s first primary scandium mine at Nyngan, NSW, Australia. The project has received all key approvals, including a development consent and a mining lease necessary to proceed with project construction.

The market should know this, so that’s really is not the story here. But let’s back up a moment.

As you probably know by now, scandium is a critical material that is used as an additive to aluminum alloys that hardens and strengthens the end product. Not unlike titanium alloys, a scandium alloy allows for lighter weight but equivalent (or better) strength components. The usage is being embraced by specific industries, but notably, two Russian jet fighters (MiG-21 and MiG-29) use scandium alloys in their construction. Other uses for scandium alloys include (but not exclusive to) automobiles, fuel cells, and other defense products.

While the company had an initial 50% interest in 2010, it closed the acquisition to become a 100% owner of the Nyngan Scandium Project in 2014. With an NI 43-101 report on the property in 2014, a Definitive Feasibility Study in 2015 and an updated NI 43-101/Definitive Feasibility Study in 2016, the company conducted process testing as recommended in the 2016 DFS prior to commencing detailed engineering on the project. An initial Mining Lease was granted in 2017 but due to a prior filing of objection by a local landowner, it was not until July 2019 that a revised Mining Lease was received due to local landowner objections.

Here we are in 2021 – that’s a long time to work on a mining project, but it is not uncommon. All the company needs is a product purchaser and capital to fund the mine development.

Now it gets interesting

In the interim, management also commenced work on the processing side of scandium. Like most resource business, the more of the value chain that you can capture, the more return for your shareholders, so that makes sense. The company was successful in its work and successfully demonstrated the ability to manufacture an aluminum-scandium master alloy (Al-Sc2%), from scandium oxide, using a patent-pending melt process involving aluminothermic reactions.

As an offshoot of the process technology work, the company has also developed ion exchange (IX) technology and knowhow to recover scandium, cobalt, and other critical metals from solvent extraction (SX) raffinate and other acidic waste streams in certain acid leach operations of the copper mining process. Copper ore bodies have a number of associated metals that usually wind up in the waste stream. Many of these “waste” metals include nickel, beryllium, scandium, and zinc to name a few which are in low enough concentration to not necessarily be economic to recover. Some might notice that these metals are “critical materials” and can be used in batteries.

As a follow on to their work in metals recovery technology, the company announced in September 2020 that it had filed a provisional patent application with the US Patent Office seeking patent rights on various applications of scandium in lithium-ion batteries. The patent application covers a number of scandium enhancements, including doping potential for both anodes and cathodes and for solid electrolytes.

So you can see that with Scandium International Mining Corp., investors have exposure to a project-ready scandium mine in Australia. But they also have exposure to critical metals recovery technology and potential usage in lithium-ion batteries as well as solid oxide fuel cells.

It’s not just a mining company anymore….and potentially more valuable as a critical materials or battery technology company.

Watch this space!




Scandium International signs LOI with Australia’s largest defense exporter

Despite scandium’s scarcity and high cost, interest in the metal is high with multiple high value commercial uses having been developed. Of particular interest is the alloy of scandium into aluminum metal products. Used in a combination with other common aluminum alloys scandium can produce stronger, more corrosion resistant, heat tolerant, weldable aluminum products. This alloy is strong enough to be welded rather than riveted, resulting in lighter, more fuel efficient craft that are cheaper to produce and run. Aircraft manufacturers are particularly interested in scandium alloyed aluminum materials. Aircraft designers believe use of Al-Sc alloys can reduce aircraft weights by 15%-20%.

Scandium International Mining Corp. (TSX: SCY) owns an 100% interest in the Nyngan Scandium Project, the world’s first scandium only mine development project, located in New South Wales, Australia.

Nyngan Scandium Project

Mineral exploration at the site has defined a measured and indicated resource significantly larger than the currently planned 20 year mine life. The average process plant feed grade over project life is 409 ppm of scandium. Feasibility Study Highlights include, a capital cost project estimate of US$87 m with operating costs of US$557 per kg of scandium oxide, producing an estimated 37,690 kg of oxide per year over the mine life.

On Nov 20, 2018, Scandium International has signed a Letter Of Intent (LOI) with Austal Ltd., the world’s largest aluminum shipbuilder and Australia’s largest defense exporter, to test scandium-containing aluminum alloys in marine applications. The LOI calls for the Scandium International to contribute various aluminum alloy samples containing scandium, for testing by Austal and potentially other third party testing groups, to determine suitability in marine and defense applications. In over thirty years of operation, Austal has constructed over 300 vessels for 100 operators in 54 countries around the world. Scandium International intends to publicly report a summary of the results at the conclusion of the program.

George Putnam, CEO of Scandium International Mining Corp. commented: “We are very pleased to add Austal to our list of partners exploring scandium’s advantages in marine/naval applications. Austal is a design leader in high-speed marine vessels utilizing aluminum hulls and superstructures for lightweight design and fast, efficient performance. We believe scandium additions will deliver unique and useful property values in marine environments, and we believe Austal represents an ideal partner to determine their applicability.”

Other Letters Of Intents Scandium International has include:

PAB Coventry Ltd. (PAB) to test scandium containing alloys in aluminum sheet forming applications. PAB has been a well-known parts and forms supplier to the upper market segment of the British automotive industry for decades.

Impression Technologies Ltd. (ITL) to also test aluminum sheet forming applications. ITL are a privately held technology company, developing and licensing its advanced aluminum forming technology, Hot Form Quench (“HFQ®“), to automotive, aerospace, rail and electronics industries, globally.

Eck Industries Inc. The LOI calls for the Scandium International to contribute aluminum -scandium master alloy 2%, for mixing and trial-testing of proprietary alloys by Eck.

Grainger & Worrall Ltd. The LOI also calls for the Scandium International to contribute aluminum -scandium master alloy 2%, for mixing and trial-testing. The test work will be undertaken at Grainger and Worrals production facilities in Shropshire England, first as a limited test-run, and if successful, later at small production scale.

Scandium International has many partners in place testing to prove that this super metal with its  lightweight, strength and corrosion resistance properties, could have a huge potential future with demand from the aerospace, aviation and electric vehicle industries.

Scandium International Mining Corp. is headquartered in the US state of Nevada, has its flagship project in Australia and is listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange.