EDITOR: | April 15th, 2014 | 1 Comment

Share interest spurred by Theralase’s state-of-the-art lasers for the treatment of chronic pain

| April 15, 2014 | 1 Comment
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wesloskyApril 15, 2014 — Roger Dumoulin-White, P. Eng, President and CEO for Theralase Technologies Inc. (‘Theralase’, TSXV: TLT | OTCBB: TLTFF) speaks to Tracy Weslosky, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of InvestorIntel about Theralase’s state-of-the-art patented laser equipment for biostimulative and biodestructive clinical applications to treat chronic pain. Theralase’s shares haves been performing well and Roger explains that this should be no surprise because “our technology speaks for itself. It’s patented technology; it’s state of the art and it’s addressing an unmet need in the industry and in the medical world. There’s a one hundred billion dollar pain market in the US, which is what our therapeutic is gauged for and the bladder cancer market we’re going into is a four billion dollar unmet need.”

Theralase has high demand technology applications already available to the market such as the TLC 1000 series: “it’s a best in-class technology, able to penetrate four inches into tissue. So, we can target tissue, target pain, we can target inflammation and accelerate tissue healing the advancements that we want to make.” However, Theralase plans to introduce a more advanced technology in the fourth quarter of 2014. The main advancement is that the light will be monitored; giving the operator a reading of exactly how deep it is reaching and how much energy is deposited at that depth. This means the equipment can be tailored or calibrated for a variety of conditions and patients: “We know exactly how deep the light is going and how much light; therefore, the new technology is very patient specific; as we all know individuals and their conditions are different.” Theralase’s current line of technology aims to heal tissue, from humans to animals. Some of its patented technology is also used in oncology and bacterial destruction.

Roger explains that the main conditions targeted by the technology are neuro-muscular-skeletal; this implies such things as sport injuries, wound healing, geriatric conditions such as arthritis or chronic pain problems. The reason that the technology has such reach as to be suitable for humans and animals — such as horses, cats, dogs or dolphins — is that “mammalian tissue is all the same.” So, Theralase’s technology works by injecting light harmlessly into tissue; the light is absorbed by proteins in tissue cells and transformed into biochemical energy, which the cells then use to heal themselves in half the normal time. So, all tissue types can be treated as well as all injury types, regardless of severity.

Theralase, meanwhile, has a number of benchmarks and targets in the near future, which have been getting attention from investors. Roger explains that Theralase’s technology “is best-in-class in the sense that it can reach down four inches of tissue, but what happens is that patients’ physical characteristics change; they have different skin colorations different levels of subcutaneous fat and muscle and it all affects the propagation of light through tissue. So all the technology on the market today has no way of determining how deep that light is going….Our new technology takes into account all that variability because it can determine, regardless of the patient, how deep the light is going,” such that it can deliver the exact dose of energy — or light — required. Roger adds that “we’ve discovered that light is a drug.

If you put too little, you don’t get an effect. If you put too much you don’t get a good effect; it is very similar to pharmaceutical drugs, such as aspirin: if you took a tenth of an aspirin, it’s not going to cure your headache and if you took 200 aspirins you would end up going to the emergency room.” So, it is the same thing with light; a certain amount is needed to obtain the desired results and that is what Theralase’s technology will achieve later in 2014. As for the all-important bottom line, Theralase has been selling in the CAD$ 1–2 million range in Ontario, but it is expanding into Western Canada and in a more significant way in the much larger US market: “with this new technology we’re going into a recurring revenue model. We have about 1200 systems in the field now of our existing technology; we plan to trade them up to our new technology.” The doctors, therapists and chiropractors who use Theralase generate on average around ten thousand dollars a month. Theralase plans to rent the new technology to healthcare professionals for about 500 dollars a month, “so they would take home 95% of the revenue and in that model it allows us to provide them with warranty, marketing, clinical support, technical support to partner in their business, for as long as they have the equipment. Under that type of model, for every thousand units that we place in the field, we will be generating five hundred thousand dollars a month of mostly profit.”

Disclaimer: Theralase Technologies Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel.


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Comments

  • J. Best

    Really excited when I saw this interview and article as this equipment in in use at a clinic I go to for sciatica problems. The staff speak very highly of the company and the product…..good to know. Thanks for the interview Tracy and thanks to Theralase for their contribution to pain management. This one is definitely on my ‘hit list’.

    April 16, 2014 - 11:06 AM

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