December 08, 2022

Achieving Net Zero Greenhouse Gas Emission Needs Nuclear

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The world has (mostly) committed to “net zero” by around mid-century, meaning that there will be no net emissions of “greenhouse gasses”, which encompasses a lot of things. The problem is how to get there? Our world is a mostly hydrocarbon-based energy economy. No one is willing to go backwards or compromise anything to get there, so something has to give.

Crosscheck to nuclear power for a moment, this cleantech option is regrettably demonized by activists. We struggle to counter the social media operatives with science and mathematics. Canada, which once lead the world in nuclear reactor technology with the Candu reactor design (safe and reliable) is still a global leader in uranium exploration, energy resources, and safe and efficient uranium mining, mostly in the province of Saskatchewan.

Enter Fission 3.0 Corp. (TSXV: FUU | OTCQB: FISOF) – a third generation company with a management team that has already succeeded twice in finding uranium in one of the most prolific uranium districts in the world, the Athabasca Basin in Saskatchewan. There are a significant number of exploration companies with exploration assets in the region, but Fission has the benefit of “been there, done that” twice in the area, so we can say with some degree of certainty that Fission is run by one of Canada’s leading uranium exploration teams.

We recently interviewed CEO Dev Randhawa on the Uranium Boomlet and how US President Biden is continuing with former President Trump’s green energy policies. After all, you can’t have electric cars without electricity if Net Zero is the objective, the world cannot generate enough electricity without the nuclear option.

Fission 3.0 recently raised $8.0 million and has about $10.0 million cash on the balance sheet, so they are well-funded for future drilling. As investors know “discoveries matter” and also, you must (in any industry) invest with teams that have done it before. The exploration team at Fission has a successful methodology that has a proven track record and in Saskatchewan, that is a necessity.

With cash in the bank, the company estimates that it has enough cash in the bank to initially drill three of its exploration prospects. Plans are being made for winter drilling and the associated logistics, so watch for drilling to commence this winter with results to come out afterwards. The company currently owns their properties, 100%, but may be looking to joint venture with partners as well. In any event, they can drill the projects on their own if they decide to do that.

It is naïve to think that just nuclear energy will save the world from a cold and dark future, as I agree with Bill Gates that the road to avoiding climate disaster will take many difficult paths to get  to Net Zero. But in the shorter term, we need alternate, clean sources of energy. You can argue successfully about the contribution of hydrocarbons to climate change, but you cannot argue that nuclear is not a viable option.

Fission 3.0 is part of the solution. They have successfully done it twice before – it’s hard to argue that.

Disclaimer: The author of this post may or may not be a shareholder of any of the companies mentioned in this column. None of the companies discussed in the above feature have paid for this content. The writer of this article/post/column/opinion is not an investment advisor, and is neither licensed to nor is making any buy or sell recommendations. For more information about this or any other company, please review their public documents to conduct your own due diligence. To access the InvestorIntel.com disclaimer and other important legal notices, click here.

One response

  1. anonymous Avatar
    anonymous

    Tracy, thanks for bring this important reality, Nuclear power is a viable option for the shorter term needs, as society reduces it’s dependency on fossil fuels for certain transitional industries (i.e. EV).
    It’s good to see that Fission 3.0 is a company with the foresight to know new “domestic” uranium resources will be required in the coming years and decades.

    Now that Governments and Industries are realizing that “Globalization” is not compatible when it comes to critical materials and supply chains, I would like to add to your valuable comments regarding Fussion3.0. In regards to nuclear power the two most critical materials, required before you even build a nuclear power plant are Uranium and Zirconium metal. If you do not have these two critical materials, you can not build a nuclear power plant. Of course the uranium is the energy source to make steam to turn the turbine thus generating electricity. Zirconium metal is the cladding (the fuel rod) which holds the uranium pellets. The real issue here is China produces over 95% of the worlds zirconium starting chemical used to make the zirconium metal cladding for the reactor. Therefore, if this control by the Chinese of the initial zirconium compound used to develop the nuclear supply chain is not addressed, then the Western world will be in the same position we are currently in with regards to Rare Earths and Chinese control. It is important to note, many of the junior rare earth mines contain zirconium in various ore complexes. Thus the critical materials industry needs to address and include an understanding of the importance of zirconium in regards to the worlds goal of reducing CO2 emissions.

    Tracy, thanks again for this informative article

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