Graphene and the Oil Industry.

Carbon-nanotube-spongeTo demonstrate, Hashim dropped the sponge into a dish of water with used motor oil floating on top. The sponge soaked it up. He then put a match to the material, burned off the oil and returned the sponge to the water to absorb more. The robust sponge can be used repeatedly and stands up to abuse; he said a sample remained elastic after about 10,000 compressions in the lab. The sponge can also store the oil for later retrieval, he said.

Move over BP in the Gulf of Mexico, make room for the scientists at Rice and Penn State Universities. The next time BP or anyone else sets off a giant oil spill, thanks to graphene and boron, we might finally have a fast way to deal with it and recover or burn off the oil.

But this new graphene/boron development has much wider uses than just bailing out the oil industry. “Oil-spill remediation and environmental cleanup are just the beginning of how useful these new nanotube materials could be," Terrones added. "For example, we could use these materials to make more efficient and lighter batteries. We could use them as scaffolds for bone-tissue regeneration. We even could impregnate the nanotube sponge with polymers to fabricate robust and light composites for the automobile and plane industries."

We are right at the start of the latest industrial revolution. “To infinity and beyond,” as someone once said, and they weren’t just talking about the Eurozone’s debt.

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Sponging Up Oil Spills: Nanosponges Soak Up Oil Again and Again
Researchers at Rice University and Penn State University have discovered that adding a dash of boron to carbon while creating nanotubes turns them into solid, spongy, reusable blocks that have an astounding ability to absorb oil spilled in water.

That's one of a range of potential innovations for the material created in a single step. The team found for the first time that boron puts kinks and elbows into the nanotubes as they grow and promotes the formation of covalent bonds, which give the sponges their robust qualities.

The researchers, who collaborated with peers in labs around the nation and in Spain, Belgium and Japan, revealed their discovery in Nature's online open-access journal Scientific Reports.

Lead author Daniel Hashim, a graduate student in the Rice lab of materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan, said the blocks are both superhydrophobic (they hate water, so they float really well) and oleophilic (they love oil). The nanosponges, which are more than 99 percent air, also conduct electricity and can easily be manipulated with magnets.

—-"These samples can be made pretty large and can be easily scaled up," said Hashim, holding a half-inch square block of billions of nanotubes. "They're super-low density, so the available volume is large. That's why the uptake of oil can be so high." He said the sponges described in the paper can absorb more than a hundred times their weight in oil.
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